RetireNet.com

The Retirement Net Premier retirement living featuring retirement communities and retirement homes in planned active developments. Worldwide resource for active retirement senior communities, rv/resort homes, vacation homes and assisted living facilities. The Retirement Net is the most comprehensive resource of premier retirement communities throughout the world featuring site built homes, manufactured homes, assisted living facilities, planned active retirement communities and various retirement properties worldwide. See also: senior housing, retirement communities, retirement living, elder care network.

Welcome, Guest!   Sign InSign Up

Search by Location & Lifestyle...

Search

Or use our Advanced Search for either Communities or Homes

Search for listings in CanadaGo to Saved Searches

Not a member yet? Sign up today!

Sign Up Sign Up

Find out more about the benefits of becoming a RetireNet.com member!

Viagra for Women?

Add Article To Favorites Add to Favorites   Share  Recommend 2 Recommendations

Could the Little Blue Pill Be Right for You?

Posted July 20, 2009



Millions of middle-aged men have used Viagra in order to improve erections and enhance their sex lives. Ever since the drug was first released in 1998 there has been talk about the possible benefits for women suffering from sexual dysfunction. Certainly Pfizer (and other pharmaceutical companies) would like to expand their sales to the other half of the human population.

Once a prescription drug is approved for at least one indication, physicians are free to prescribe it for any other disorders or symptoms for which they believe it would be effective, a practice called off-label prescribing. Now some doctors are prescribing sildenafil (Viagra) off-label for women with sexual dysfunction.

We know that depression can cause both men and women to lose desire for sex. But the medications that many take to treat depression can also cause sexual problems. Sexual dysfunction is common for women taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, encompassing decreased interest in sex and physical arousal, painful intercourse, and difficulty reaching orgasm. That's why many women stop taking SSRIs.

A new study suggests that the erectile dysfunction drug sildenafil (Viagra) can help. The study was reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Volume 300, page 395). It suggests that Viagra may help women suffering from sexual dysfunction regain their sexual desire and enjoyment.

Researchers enrolled 98 women treated with SSRIs for major depression who were experiencing sexual dysfunction. Half were randomized to take 50 to 100 mg of Viagra one to two hours before sexual activity; the others were given a placebo. The participants' sexual function was measured using standard questionnaires.

After eight weeks, nearly three out of four women experienced better sexual response. Only 28% of women taking Viagra reported no improvement in sexual interest and satisfaction compared with 73% of placebo takers. The most common side effects were headaches, flushing, and indigestion—but no women dropped out of the trial because of these.

In men, Viagra inhibits an enzyme that results in improved blood flow to the penis, and it appears that the same enzyme is in female genital tissue. Viagra is not yet approved for women, but doctors may start prescribing it for this purpose. But before you rush to your doctor for a prescription for yourself or the woman in your life, you should be aware not everyone thinks Viagra will work for most women.

Mayo Clinic Internist, Jacqueline M. Thielen, M.D., says, "Although women experiencing loss of sex function due to antidepressants may respond to Viagra, for most women simply addressing difficulties with arousal may not get to the actual problem—which is often a lack of sexual desire."

Dr. Thielen goes on to note that many factors can influence a woman's sexual desire:

Many women find that the stresses of daily life deplete their desire for sex.

Highs and lows in sexual desire may coincide with the beginning or end of a relationship or major life changes, such as pregnancy or menopause.

For some women, orgasm can be elusive—causing concerns or preoccupations that lead to a loss of interest in sex.

Desire is often connected to a woman's sense of intimacy with her partner, as well as a reaction to current relationship frustrations and past experiences. Over time, psychological troubles can contribute to biological problems and vice versa.

Some chronic conditions, such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can alter a woman's sexual-response cycle—causing discomfort during sex. Certain infections, such as yeast infections, can have the same effect.

If you're experiencing changes or difficulties with sexual function, consult your doctor. In some cases, hormones, creams, clitoral-stimulating products or other treatments may be helpful. These products don't work for everyone, however. Your doctor may also recommend that you consult a sex therapist.

If you're a man, have you tried Viagra for treating sexual dysfunction? Did it work for you?

If you're a woman, have you tried Viagra? Did it work?

Jed Diamond is director of MenAlive, a program dedicated to healing men and the women who love them. He is the author of 7 books including Male Menopause and The Irritable Male Syndrome. For more information, or to sign up for his newsletter, visit MenAlive.com.

 

Comments (2)

goodness
Oct 6, 2009 1:25 am

 

This comment has been disabled.

jamesme007james
Nov 21, 2009 12:57 am

 

This comment has been disabled.

Add A Comment

Want to leave a comment? Sign in.

 
America's Top 100 Best Master-Planned Communities Go to www.MenAlive.com

My Saved Searches

Sign In or Create your free account to see your saved searches.