RetireNet.com

The Retirement Net Premier retirement living featuring retirement communities and retirement homes in planned active developments. Worldwide resource for active retirement senior communities, rv/resort homes, vacation homes and assisted living facilities. The Retirement Net is the most comprehensive resource of premier retirement communities throughout the world featuring site built homes, manufactured homes, assisted living facilities, planned active retirement communities and various retirement properties worldwide. See also: senior housing, retirement communities, retirement living, elder care network.

Welcome, Guest!   Sign InSign Up

Search by Location & Lifestyle...

Search

Or use our Advanced Search for either Communities or Homes

Search for listings in CanadaGo to Saved Searches

Our featured image is from the Southern California region.

Not a member yet? Sign up today!

Sign Up Sign Up

Find out more about the benefits of becoming a RetireNet.com member!

Does Lung Cancer Discriminate?

Add Article To Favorites Add to Favorites   Share  Recommend 0 Recommendations

Addressing the lack of diversity in lung cancer clinical trials

Posted March 5, 2012



Research shows that racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to develop cancer and die from it than the general U.S. population, but are historically underrepresented in clinical trials. As part of lung cancer awareness month, Dr. Coleman Obasaju, a frequent speaker on health disparities around the world, provides his take on the issue. Obasaju is a clinical and senior medical director at Lilly Oncology.

Q: Why does lung cancer disproportionately impact minority populations?

Obasaju: Lung cancer maintains its status as one of the most prevalent and deadly of all cancers. Approximately 200,000 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in the U.S. this year—globally this figure swells to about one million. This disease takes a particularly heavy toll on African Americans. Despite their lower smoking rates, African Americans are more likely than Caucasians to develop and die from lung cancer. It is not clear why African Americans have a greater risk for developing lung cancer, but researchers believe it may be in part related to a person’s genetics, environmental and socio-economic background.

Q: Why is it so critical for minorities to participate in clinical trials?

Obasaju: One way to get a better understanding of this situation is through increased diversity in clinical trials. Historically, minorities have been underrepresented. Several factors contribute to this, including a lack of awareness about the importance of diversity in cancer research. Economics, language and cultural barriers, coupled with a historical mistrust of the clinical trial process, also contribute to the low rates of minority participation.

Despite these challenges, we must continue to find ways to increase their participation. This change is vital to ensure researchers understand how lung cancer affects all populations and substantiate whether treatments are effective across all ethnic groups.

Q: What can be done to increase minority participation in clinical trials?

Obasaju: To start, research teams can identify clinical trial sites located in close proximity to minority groups. Other critical steps include translating details about clinical trial enrollment into different languages, creating culturally adaptable patient tools and working with patient navigators, who can help guide clinical trial participants through the treatment process. We need to continue to raise awareness on the importance of minority representation in clinical trials and trust that if minorities know more about this critical issue, it will inspire them to take action.

Q: Where can someone go for more information about participating in a clinical trial?

Obasaju: A healthcare provider is one of the best resources to explain how patients can participate in a clinical trial. Healthcare providers can direct eligible individuals to the most appropriate trial taking place in their area and explain the process for enrolling. There are also great resources available online, including the National Cancer Institute’s website (cancer.gov/clinicaltrials). This site allows users to search for trials that are currently enrolling participants and provides users with a variety of answers to the most pressing questions about trial participation.

Article source: ARA Content.

 

Comments (0)

Add A Comment

Want to leave a comment? Sign in.

 
 

My Saved Searches

Sign In or Create your free account to see your saved searches.